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A collection of artists, writers, free thinkers, healers, social change leaders, and all sorts of courageous uncensored creators. Every time you reshare you curate and curation is also a creative act.
#diaspora #thinkers
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
Home
 
  • Eines der ältesten dezentralen sozialen Netzwerksysteme, etwa so alt wie #Diaspora.
Krass, diaspora* und Friendica gelten inzwischen als alt in diesem Bereich ^^ Mir kommt es noch wie gestern vor dass die sich aus dem Boden erhoben.
 

ActivityPub - Final thoughts, one year later.

#Fediverse #Diaspora #ActivityPub #ap #development #TheFederation
 

#Föderation Statistik



Momentan kennt dieser Knoten 4261 Knoten mit insgesamt 2613673 registrierten Nutzern, die die folgenden Plattformen verwenden:

#Friendica (375/14436)
#diaspora (306/681736)
#red (8/97)
#hubzilla (266/7453)
#GNUSocial (137/18409)
#StatusNet (9/183)
#Mastodon (2707/1880123)
#Pleroma (448/10111)
#socialhome (3/904)
#ganggo (2/221)

(Anzahl der Server/Gesamtnutzeranzahl aller Server)

#Fediverse
 
Meh... Hashtag #Friendica falsch geschrieben, da (soweit ich weiß) nur #Friendica Korrekturen kann (#Diaspora theoretisch auch) ist damit nun die Reichweite dieses Tags schon mal für den Arsch. :-/
 
Damit alle, die #neuhier sind auch mal etwas in ihrem Stream zu sehen bekommen, ist hier mal eine Übersicht über "offizielle" Präsenzen von Institutionen, Bloggern usw. im #fediverse. Das soll jetzt mal keine Liste mit gespiegelten Newsfeeds sein, sondern wirklich aktive Konten.

Die Liste ist hoffentlich nicht vollständig und kann gerne in den Kommentaren erweitert werden. Alle, die hier in der Liste auftauchen, sind auch mehr oder weniger aktiv. Ich werde diese Liste auch regelmäßig aktualisieren.

Es wäre natürlich toll, wenn möglichst viele diesen Konten folgen, damit die verantwortlichen Redakteure usw. sehen, das es Sinn macht, auch hier ein Konto zu haben und nicht nur eine Handvoll Nerds damit bespielt werden.

Zum Folgen dieser Accounts einfach dem Link folgen und auf Verbinden klicken, oder den Link kopiert, bei euch unter Kontakte geht, im Feld Neue Kontakte hinzufügen den Link einfügt und auf Verbinden klickt.

Nachrichten, (Netz)Politik usw.






Kultur und Unterhaltung






Kommerzielles usw.






Die hier sind leider ziemlich inaktiv:




Politisches, Stiftungen, Parteien






Bei denen hier passiert leider nicht mehr so viel:




Federation






AStAs






Diverses






Critical Mass






Hier passiert leider nicht mehr so viel:




Spanisches und Französisches






Mastodon Accounts


Den Accounts auf Mastodon können die Nutzer auf Diaspora leider nicht folgen, das geht nur von Friendica aus.




Hier passiert leider nicht mehr so viel:




GNU Social






Draft


Die folgenden habe ich noch nicht alle durchgeschaut, sehen aber alle interessant aus.





Die hier habe ich auch noch nicht angeschaut
linux distro

  • thechakraproject@joindiaspora.com



News/Publishing - FS/Linux

  • Linuxblaetter@joindiaspora.com
  • linuxfr_officieux@framasphere.org
  • linuxuprising@libranet.de
  • facil@framasphere.org
  • rationalreview@joindiaspora.com



Inoffizielle Accounts


Bei den "inoffiziellen" Accounts handelt es sich meist um gespiegelte Feeds, d.h. interaktion findet da nicht statt, aber sie sind ganz interessant, damit der eigene Stream anfangs nicht so leer ist. Zu finden sind diese infoffiziellen Accounts im Friendica Directory:




Foren


Bei Friendica gibt es auch Foren, vergleichbar mit den Gruppen bei #Facebook. Den Foren können auch Diaspora-Nutzer beitreten und folgen.




Thanks to


@lostinlight, @Guido Arnold, @Markus, @resu, @Perig Gouanvic, @Hochschulpiraten Dresden

Wenn Ihr noch weitere solcher Accounts kennt. könnt Ihr den Beitrag gerne kommentieren.

Viel Spaß im Fediverse

#newhere #neuhier #diaspora #friendica #mastodon #gnusocial #fediverse #gplusrefugee #googleplusrefugee #gplus #fbrefugee


!G Plus Minus
 
Damit alle, die #neuhier sind auch mal etwas in ihrem Stream zu sehen bekommen, ist hier mal eine Übersicht über "offizielle" Präsenzen von Institutionen, Bloggern usw. im #fediverse. Das soll jetzt mal keine Liste mit gespiegelten Newsfeeds sein, sondern wirklich aktive Konten.

Die Liste ist hoffentlich nicht vollständig und kann gerne in den Kommentaren erweitert werden. Alle, die hier in der Liste auftauchen, sind auch mehr oder weniger aktiv. Ich werde diese Liste auch regelmäßig aktualisieren.

Es wäre natürlich toll, wenn möglichst viele diesen Konten folgen, damit die verantwortlichen Redakteure usw. sehen, das es Sinn macht, auch hier ein Konto zu haben und nicht nur eine Handvoll Nerds damit bespielt werden.

Zum Folgen dieser Accounts einfach dem Link folgen und auf Verbinden klicken, oder den Link kopiert, bei euch unter Kontakte geht, im Feld Neue Kontakte hinzufügen den Link einfügt und auf Verbinden klickt.

Nachrichten, (Netz)Politik usw.






Kultur und Unterhaltung






Kommerzielles usw.






Die hier sind leider ziemlich inaktiv:




Politisches, Stiftungen, Parteien






Bei denen hier passiert leider nicht mehr so viel:




Federation






AStAs






Diverses






Critical Mass






Hier passiert leider nicht mehr so viel:




Spanisches und Französisches






Mastodon Accounts


Den Accounts auf Mastodon können die Nutzer auf Diaspora leider nicht folgen, das geht nur von Friendica aus.




Hier passiert leider nicht mehr so viel:




GNU Social






Draft


Die folgenden habe ich noch nicht alle durchgeschaut, sehen aber alle interessant aus.





Die hier habe ich auch noch nicht angeschaut
linux distro

  • thechakraproject@joindiaspora.com



News/Publishing - FS/Linux

  • Linuxblaetter@joindiaspora.com
  • linuxfr_officieux@framasphere.org
  • linuxuprising@libranet.de
  • facil@framasphere.org
  • rationalreview@joindiaspora.com



Inoffizielle Accounts


Bei den "inoffiziellen" Accounts handelt es sich meist um gespiegelte Feeds, d.h. interaktion findet da nicht statt, aber sie sind ganz interessant, damit der eigene Stream anfangs nicht so leer ist. Zu finden sind diese infoffiziellen Accounts im Friendica Directory:




Foren


Bei Friendica gibt es auch Foren, vergleichbar mit den Gruppen bei #Facebook. Den Foren können auch Diaspora-Nutzer beitreten und folgen.




Thanks to


@lostinlight, @Guido Arnold, @Markus, @resu, @Perig Gouanvic, @Hochschulpiraten Dresden

Wenn Ihr noch weitere solcher Accounts kennt. könnt Ihr den Beitrag gerne kommentieren.

Viel Spaß im Fediverse

#newhere #neuhier #diaspora #friendica #mastodon #gnusocial #fediverse #gplusrefugee #googleplusrefugee #gplus #fbrefugee
 

Google was kind enough to let us free !

Google was kind enough to let us free !
----------------------------------------------------------


Double, double, toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Fillet of a trumpy snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;

Messages from your latest blog,
Fur of cat and tongue of dog,

Plusser's talk and cats that sing,
Google+ is sinking, that's the thing,

Say goodbye to all that trouble,
Let the hell-broth boil and bubble.

#pluspora #diaspora #fediverse #gplusrefugee #gplus #mywork #gif
 
Wer hat Lust mal #Friendica zu testen?

Was ist Friendica?
- Eines der ältesten dezentralen sozialen Netzwerksysteme, etwa so alt wie #Diaspora.
- Kann kommunizieren mit #Mastodon, #Diaspora und anderen kompatiblen Netzwerken.
- Teil des #Fediverse.

Meldet euch auf meinem Server an und probiert es aus.
https://friendica.utzer.de/admin/
 
#Urheberrechtsreform: Artikel 13 bedeutet das Ende alternativer sozialer Medien

#saveyourinternet #Piraten #Politik #europeanunion #Artikel13 #Diaspora #Mastodon #Friendica #Fediverse #Freiheit #UploadFilter
 
Copyright Reform: Article 13 will be the end for alternative social media


#freedom #saveyourinternet #Piraten #pirates #politics #europeanunion #Article13 #Diaspora #Mastodon #Friendica #Fediverse
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
Home
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
Home
Halle (Saale) 
It is also very important that there are a lot of nice and helpful people and a lot of support. If you have any questions, there will be always someone available to help you, - when you tag your posting with

#support, #question, #help, #diaspora, #newhere... #Hilfe, #frage, #neuhier,
 
Bild/Foto
Multi-column Stream and Comments in Diaspora https://userstyles.org/styles/168773/3-column-diaspora

For Google+ style multiple column stream:

1) Download Stylus plugin (Chrome, Firefox or Opera): https://add0n.com/stylus.html (see upper right)

2) Install "3 Column Diaspora": https://userstyles.org/styles/168773/3-column-diaspora

Enjoy!

TALLER NOTIFICATIONS DROPDOWN (@Doc Edward Morbius)
EXPAND ALL POSTS (@Gible Fog)
TRIPLE COLUMN STREAM (@Filip H.F. "FiXato" Slagter)
DOUBLE COLUMN COMMENTS (@Isaac Kuo)

Optional: If you want to delete or tweak some enhancements, edit the style (under S icon, select "Manage")

(If you aren't using the pluspora.com pod, you'll have to add your pod's domain to the domain list)

#diaspora #diasporatips #tip #tips
 
Bild/Foto
Multi-column Stream and Comments in Diaspora https://userstyles.org/styles/168773/3-column-diaspora

For Google+ style multiple column stream:

1) Download Stylus plugin (Chrome, Firefox or Opera): https://add0n.com/stylus.html (see upper right)

2) Install "3 Column Diaspora": https://userstyles.org/styles/168773/3-column-diaspora

Enjoy!

TALLER NOTIFICATIONS DROPDOWN (@Doc Edward Morbius)
EXPAND ALL POSTS (@Gible Fog)
TRIPLE COLUMN STREAM (@Filip H.F. "FiXato" Slagter)
DOUBLE COLUMN COMMENTS (@Isaac Kuo)

Optional: If you want to delete or tweak some enhancements, edit the style (under S icon, select "Manage")

(If you aren't using the pluspora.com pod, you'll have to add your pod's domain to the domain list)

#diaspora #diasporatips #tip #tips
 

Are you willing to contribute some money to help diaspora\*s development?





Hey awesome diaspora* community! Today I'm asking you a very special question. At the moment, the development speed of the diaspora* project is quite slow. It looks like this is not only because not many people are interested in contributing to diaspora*, but also because the volunteers who compose the core team don't have enough time to do the review work needed, adding more delays to everything.

The core team is doing all lot of background work. They maintain all the official services: the website, the HQ pod, our Discourse and the wiki. They do the sysadmin job of installing and keeping those services up to date, but they also are the moderators who fight spam. They answer many questions and help developers, podmins, and users. They do the release management and push out new versions of diaspora*. But most important of all, they are the ones doing the final reviews, the very important task of checking the code submitted by other contributors, helping them improve the code, and then integrate it inside diaspora* for everyone.

This is a lot of work, and even if it is less visible than new features, this work is critical because if it is not done, the project is stuck.

We unfortunately reached a point where the limited time of the core team as volunteers slows down the diaspora* development. Two very important features, the accounts migration and the API, are waiting for a review for several weeks while the core team currently is busy with all the tasks listed above, as well as other tasks like the creation of a new official website. To go forward, the diaspora* project needs someone from the core team to be dedicating more time to these diaspora* background jobs at least a couple of hours per month more.

So, to the important question...

If a diaspora* core team member would set up a Patreon or something similar that allows them to fund more time to do the maintenance and review work, would you contribute to that fund?

A big warning here: This is not about paying someone to be able to decide what they will be working on. There is BountySource if you want to support the development of specific features with money. This is about allowing someone to have some dedicated time to work on the maintenance tasks of the diaspora* project, mainly reviews. This core developer will be the one who will choose how they will spend their time, most of the time. But as the core team members are the ones who are the most aware of what's going on with the project, I think we can trust them to do the best choices to improve diaspora* development speed.

So, would you give a few bucks monthly? I would totally do!

#diaspora #diaspora-dev #contribute #donate
 
Bild/Foto

Multi-column Stream in diaspora!


One thing I like about Google+ is the multi-column stream view. It means I can browse articles more quickly than with a single column view, with less scrolling effort. Conversely, it means my followers can browse articles more quickly, so more people see my posts. It's great! More engagement, more enjoyment, less time spent.

Diaspora has many features I like, being similar to early G+. But it has just a single column stream view...until now! It turns out that adding a small bit of CSS code gives a crude multi-column stream view. It's not neat Masonry tiling, with weird gaps. But it's good enough for me.

The steps to do this are:

1) Use Chrome or Chromium

2) Install the Stylus plugin (search for "stylus chrome")

3) Go to pluspora.com (or whatever diaspora pod you're on)

4) Click on the “S” plugin icon in the upper right; select Write Style for pluspora.com

5) Paste the code:
#main-stream .stream-element { 
    float: left; 
    width: 33%; 
} 

.container-fluid { 
    max-width: 3000px; 
} 

.col-md-3 { 
    width: 15%; 
}

6)Click “Save” to save your new style.

#diaspora #diasporatips #tips #tip
 
Bild/Foto

Multi-column Stream in diaspora!


One thing I like about Google+ is the multi-column stream view. It means I can browse articles more quickly than with a single column view, with less scrolling effort. Conversely, it means my followers can browse articles more quickly, so more people see my posts. It's great! More engagement, more enjoyment, less time spent.

Diaspora has many features I like, being similar to early G+. But it has just a single column stream view...until now! It turns out that adding a small bit of CSS code gives a crude multi-column stream view. It's not neat Masonry tiling, with weird gaps. But it's good enough for me.

The steps to do this are:

1) Use Chrome or Chromium

2) Install the Stylus plugin (search for "stylus chrome")

3) Go to pluspora.com (or whatever diaspora pod you're on)

4) Click on the “S” plugin icon in the upper right; select Write Style for pluspora.com

5) Paste the code:
#main-stream .stream-element { 
    float: left; 
    width: 33%; 
} 

.container-fluid { 
    max-width: 3000px; 
} 

.col-md-3 { 
    width: 15%; 
}

6)Click “Save” to save your new style.

#diaspora #diasporatips #tips #tip
 
Bild/Foto

Multi-column Stream in diaspora!


One thing I like about Google+ is the multi-column stream view. It means I can browse articles more quickly than with a single column view, with less scrolling effort. Conversely, it means my followers can browse articles more quickly, so more people see my posts. It's great! More engagement, more enjoyment, less time spent.

Diaspora has many features I like, being similar to early G+. But it has just a single column stream view...until now! It turns out that adding a small bit of CSS code gives a crude multi-column stream view. It's not neat Masonry tiling, with weird gaps. But it's good enough for me.

The steps to do this are:

1) Use Chrome or Chromium

2) Install the Stylus plugin (search for "stylus chrome")

3) Go to pluspora.com (or whatever diaspora pod you're on)

4) Click on the “S” plugin icon in the upper right; select Write Style for pluspora.com

5) Paste the code:
#main-stream .stream-element { 
    float: left; 
    width: 33%; 
} 

.container-fluid { 
    max-width: 3000px; 
} 

.col-md-3 { 
    width: 15%; 
}

6)Click “Save” to save your new style.

#diaspora #diasporatips #tips #tip
 

Diaspora CSS tweaks: Notifications pane height


I've just thrown the following into my Diaspora stylesheet using the Stylus CSS manager extention (Firefox / Chrome / Safari, etc.):
.navbar.navbar-fixed-top .nav-badges .dropdown-menu .notifications { 
    max-height: calc(85vh - 4em); 
    min-height: 8em; 
}

I'd found the previous 350px max height far too short, especially for all the love I've been getting. This will dynamically extend the panel to within 4em of the visible viewpane floor.

It might make a nice feature enhancement for Diaspora core.

#diaspora #css #tips #webDev #googleplus
 

Are you willing to contribute some money to help diaspora\*s development?





Hey awesome diaspora* community! Today I'm asking you a very special question. At the moment, the development speed of the diaspora* project is quite slow. It looks like this is not only because not many people are interested in contributing to diaspora*, but also because the volunteers who compose the core team don't have enough time to do the review work needed, adding more delays to everything.

The core team is doing all lot of background work. They maintain all the official services: the website, the HQ pod, our Discourse and the wiki. They do the sysadmin job of installing and keeping those services up to date, but they also are the moderators who fight spam. They answer many questions and help developers, podmins, and users. They do the release management and push out new versions of diaspora*. But most important of all, they are the ones doing the final reviews, the very important task of checking the code submitted by other contributors, helping them improve the code, and then integrate it inside diaspora* for everyone.

This is a lot of work, and even if it is less visible than new features, this work is critical because if it is not done, the project is stuck.

We unfortunately reached a point where the limited time of the core team as volunteers slows down the diaspora* development. Two very important features, the accounts migration and the API, are waiting for a review for several weeks while the core team currently is busy with all the tasks listed above, as well as other tasks like the creation of a new official website. To go forward, the diaspora* project needs someone from the core team to be dedicating more time to these diaspora* background jobs at least a couple of hours per month more.

So, to the important question...

If a diaspora* core team member would set up a Patreon or something similar that allows them to fund more time to do the maintenance and review work, would you contribute to that fund?

A big warning here: This is not about paying someone to be able to decide what they will be working on. There is BountySource if you want to support the development of specific features with money. This is about allowing someone to have some dedicated time to work on the maintenance tasks of the diaspora* project, mainly reviews. This core developer will be the one who will choose how they will spend their time, most of the time. But as the core team members are the ones who are the most aware of what's going on with the project, I think we can trust them to do the best choices to improve diaspora* development speed.

So, would you give a few bucks monthly? I would totally do!

#diaspora #diaspora-dev #contribute #donate
 
♲ Alex Schroeder: Diary ():
Using Social Media
Here’s how I use social media in order for it to work out. My premise is that it is impossible to bring your friends and family along to a new platform. You need to find new friends. The only way to do it is to find people you share an interest with, and letting them know that you share their interest. The second step is important!

Make sure you have a profile that tells people what to expect.- Pick a display name.
- Write a short bio using hashtags.
- Upload a profile picture (”Avatar”).

Hashtags are important so that similar minded people can find each other.

Write an introduction. Write a post and use the hashtag #introduction on Mastodon or #newhere on Diaspora. Say who you are and what you’re interested in, and use more hashtags.

Post this introduction and pin it to your profile, if you can. Your introduction will now be the first thing people see when they visit your profile. After a while you are of course free to pin a different post to your profile. I recommend you start with your introduction, however.

Write another handful of posts. When people visit your profile, they need to see that you are interested in the things they are interested in. Your introduction is a start, but it is not enough.

Don’t just share some stuff other people have written. If the things you shared are interesting, visitors will follow the authors of the posts you shared instead of you. You need to write your own posts!

Start interacting. You can mark something as a favourite (heart, star); you can find posts you like using searches for hashtags, or by looking through timelines, and reply to these posts; and if you really like something, you can share it (reshare, boost).- Marking something as a favourite does not start a conversation. People will smile and nod and read something else.
- A reply is best in life. This is how you get a conversation started.
- A reshare or boost is nice for artists and creators, but know that people will follow you if they can get a sense of the real you, and that requires posting your own toots.
- Follow people.

How do you find more interesting people to follow? Look to see who your favourite folks are following. You can find them via the profiles of the people you are following.

Keep following people: You need to keep finding more people to follow in an interest based network since people will be dropping out all the time. Your relatives and friends from school don’t disappear as quickly on Facebook, nor do journalists and news outlets disappear on Twitter, but in the more interesting and interest-based communities, that’s simply how it is. You need to replenish the pool and keep finding and following more people. They’re everywhere.

For more information, check out How to Mastodon.

Tags: Mastodon Diaspora Social Media- - - - - -

https://alexschroeder.ch/wiki/2019-02-05_Using_Social_Media
[l]

#howto #socialmedia #diaspora #mastodon #Friendica
 
Using Social Media
Here’s how I use social media in order for it to work out. My premise is that it is impossible to bring your friends and family along to a new platform. You need to find new friends. The only way to do it is to find people you share an interest with, and letting them know that you share their interest. The second step is important!

Make sure you have a profile that tells people what to expect.
  • Pick a display name.
  • Write a short bio using hashtags.
  • Upload a profile picture (”Avatar”).
Hashtags are important so that similar minded people can find each other.

Write an introduction. Write a post and use the hashtag #introduction on Mastodon or #newhere on Diaspora. Say who you are and what you’re interested in, and use more hashtags.

Post this introduction and pin it to your profile, if you can. Your introduction will now be the first thing people see when they visit your profile. After a while you are of course free to pin a different post to your profile. I recommend you start with your introduction, however.

Write another handful of posts. When people visit your profile, they need to see that you are interested in the things they are interested in. Your introduction is a start, but it is not enough.

Don’t just share some stuff other people have written. If the things you shared are interesting, visitors will follow the authors of the posts you shared instead of you. You need to write your own posts!

Start interacting. You can mark something as a favourite (heart, star); you can find posts you like using searches for hashtags, or by looking through timelines, and reply to these posts; and if you really like something, you can share it (reshare, boost).
  • Marking something as a favourite does not start a conversation. People will smile and nod and read something else.
  • A reply is best in life. This is how you get a conversation started.
  • A reshare or boost is nice for artists and creators, but know that people will follow you if they can get a sense of the real you, and that requires posting your own toots.
  • Follow people.
How do you find more interesting people to follow? Look to see who your favourite folks are following. You can find them via the profiles of the people you are following.

Keep following people: You need to keep finding more people to follow in an interest based network since people will be dropping out all the time. Your relatives and friends from school don’t disappear as quickly on Facebook, nor do journalists and news outlets disappear on Twitter, but in the more interesting and interest-based communities, that’s simply how it is. You need to replenish the pool and keep finding and following more people. They’re everywhere.

For more information, check out How to Mastodon.

Tags: Mastodon Diaspora Social Media
https://alexschroeder.ch/wiki/2019-02-05_Using_Social_Media


#howto #socialmedia #diaspora #mastodon #Friendica
 

Are you willing to contribute some money to help diaspora\*s development?





Hey awesome diaspora* community! Today I'm asking you a very special question. At the moment, the development speed of the diaspora* project is quite slow. It looks like this is not only because not many people are interested in contributing to diaspora*, but also because the volunteers who compose the core team don't have enough time to do the review work needed, adding more delays to everything.

The core team is doing all lot of background work. They maintain all the official services: the website, the HQ pod, our Discourse and the wiki. They do the sysadmin job of installing and keeping those services up to date, but they also are the moderators who fight spam. They answer many questions and help developers, podmins, and users. They do the release management and push out new versions of diaspora*. But most important of all, they are the ones doing the final reviews, the very important task of checking the code submitted by other contributors, helping them improve the code, and then integrate it inside diaspora* for everyone.

This is a lot of work, and even if it is less visible than new features, this work is critical because if it is not done, the project is stuck.

We unfortunately reached a point where the limited time of the core team as volunteers slows down the diaspora* development. Two very important features, the accounts migration and the API, are waiting for a review for several weeks while the core team currently is busy with all the tasks listed above, as well as other tasks like the creation of a new official website. To go forward, the diaspora* project needs someone from the core team to be dedicating more time to these diaspora* background jobs at least a couple of hours per month more.

So, to the important question...

If a diaspora* core team member would set up a Patreon or something similar that allows them to fund more time to do the maintenance and review work, would you contribute to that fund?

A big warning here: This is not about paying someone to be able to decide what they will be working on. There is BountySource if you want to support the development of specific features with money. This is about allowing someone to have some dedicated time to work on the maintenance tasks of the diaspora* project, mainly reviews. This core developer will be the one who will choose how they will spend their time, most of the time. But as the core team members are the ones who are the most aware of what's going on with the project, I think we can trust them to do the best choices to improve diaspora* development speed.

So, would you give a few bucks monthly? I would totally do!

#diaspora #diaspora-dev #contribute #donate
 
Bild/Foto
Let’s keep improving Diaspora and help in any way we can.

If you can donate just a small sum it all helps as the place is held together by unpaid volunteers.
Donate Information here

If you have programming skills or feel that you can help in any way Take a look at this

As with all of my animations you can download and use it as you wish

#diaspora #fediverse #donate #help #3d #gif #cogs
 
Bild/Foto
Let’s keep improving Diaspora and help in any way we can.

If you can donate just a small sum it all helps as the place is held together by unpaid volunteers.
Donate Information here

If you have programming skills or feel that you can help in any way Take a look at this

As with all of my animations you can download and use it as you wish

#diaspora #fediverse #donate #help #3d #gif #cogs
 
Is there a tool to make offline backups of your #Diaspora posts, and is there a tool to automatically expire them after a few weeks?
 

Your name in diaspora\*


It occurred to me that most of the people who have come to diaspora\* from G+ are using their real names.

Some of you might not know that you don't have to use your real name in diaspora*. You can call yourself anything you want to. Indeed, you can be whoever you want in diaspora*. There's no need to reveal anything about yourself that you don't want to.

If you want to be a witty gecko or a highly intelligent aspidistra, you can!

Of course, if you want to 'be' yourself, and use your real name, that's fine too. But you're not restricted in that way.

Have fun!

#diaspora #gplus #gplusrefugee
Polizeipräsidium, Jürgensplatz 5, 40219 Düsseldorf, Deutschland 
In this post we found that a spam comment was not deleted on the #Diaspora end. Shouldn't deletions be federated to Diaspora and other #Friendica accounts?

@[F*] Frank Dapor #podmin @Friendica Support
 
Basically the same also applies for Friendica and Mastodon:

Your name in diaspora\*


It occurred to me that most of the people who have come to diaspora\* from G+ are using their real names.

Some of you might not know that you don't have to use your real name in diaspora*. You can call yourself anything you want to. Indeed, you can be whoever you want in diaspora*. There's no need to reveal anything about yourself that you don't want to.

If you want to be a witty gecko or a highly intelligent aspidistra, you can!

Of course, if you want to 'be' yourself, and use your real name, that's fine too. But you're not restricted in that way.

Have fun!

#diaspora #gplus #gplusrefugee
Rostock 

Followerpower


This article is based on the usage of three different systems with German interfaces, therefore I may not use the exact terms on the system or interface you are using. Screenshots are from a German interface as well. I trust you will understand the article anyway.

Resharing a post can serve two different purposes. Sometimes we just want to distribute a post, a beautiful picture maybe. That works well with all systems.

Occasionally someone has a very specific question and is looking for an answer. We are a large community with various kinds of experts. Maybe none of your followers can answer your question, because we tend to get stuck with rather basic questions outside of our fields of expertise. A programmer may have a biology question, a photographer might ask for ideas about places to see in another city. Then we reshare the post and usually there will be competent replies promptly.

It generally works across the different systems, but it's (still) somewhat quirky.

Bild/Foto

Diaspora users have a display under a post that shows who reshared the post. It is visible on all posts. If a user's own post is reshared, there is a notification. This display doesn't work correctly when Friendica- or Hubzilla users are involved. There are, in fact, more reshares. I didn't investigate why notifications are missing during my little test it seemed random.

Friendica or Hubzilla users have no display and do not get an automatic notification.

A Friendica or Hubzilla user can mention herself in a post with a question. Then she'll get notifications about mentions and will be able to find at least some reshares. Which ones depends on who shares (a contact or not) and settings. Hubzilla auto-completes mentioning yourself, friendica doesn't so you add @username@nodename manually.

Friendica and Diaspora user should always answer questions on the original post, not a reshared copy, because otherwise the answer might remain unnoticed. Hubzilla users cannot do that.

Links to the original post of a reshare are somewhat hidden in the time/date section of the original post. There are two links, one to the profile of the user and the less obvious link to the post itself.

On Diaspora:

Bild/Foto

On Friendica:

Bild/Foto

This post describes how things work in January 2019 and involved a fair amount of followerpower.

You'll find more notes about this topic here:

https://hubzilla.a-zwenkau.de/channel/anna?f=&cat=Decentralized

#Hubzilla #Friendica #Diaspora #help #question #reshare
 

Mal wieder was für die neuen

Moin zusammen,

hier mal wieder meine Liste mit evtl. interessanten Accounts für die neuen. Ich habe sie jetzt noch nicht überarbeitet, wie ich es mir eigentlich vorgenommen haben, aber ich denke, das passt noch ;-).

Damit alle, die #neuhier sind auch mal etwas in ihrem Stream zu sehen bekommen, ist hier mal eine Übersicht über "offizielle" Präsenzen von Institutionen, Bloggern usw. im #fediverse. Das soll jetzt mal keine Liste mit gespiegelten Newsfeeds sein, sondern wirklich aktive Konten.

Die Liste ist hoffentlich nicht vollständig und kann gerne in den Kommentaren erweitert werden. Alle, die hier in der Liste auftauchen, sind auch mehr oder weniger aktiv. Ich werde diese Liste auch regelmäßig aktualisieren.

Es wäre natürlich toll, wenn möglichst viele diesen Konten folgen, damit die verantwortlichen Redakteure usw. sehen, das es Sinn macht, auch hier ein Konto zu haben und nicht nur eine Handvoll Nerds damit bespielt werden.

Zum Folgen dieser Accounts einfach dem Link folgen und auf Verbinden klicken, oder den Link kopiert, bei euch unter Kontakte geht, im Feld Neue Kontakte hinzufügen den Link einfügt und auf Verbinden klickt.

Nachrichten, (Netz)Politik usw.




Kultur und Unterhaltung




Kommerzielles usw.




Politisches




Diverses




Critical Mass




Mastodon Accounts
Den Accounts auf Mastodon können die Nutzer auf Diaspora leider nicht folgen, das geht nur von Friendica aus.




Draft
Die folgenden habe ich noch nicht alle durchgeschaut, sehen aber alle interessant aus.





GNU Social




Inoffizielle Accounts
Bei den "inoffiziellen" Accounts handelt es sich meist um gespiegelte Feeds, d.h. interaktion findet da nicht statt, aber sie sind ganz interessant, damit der eigene Stream anfangs nicht so leer ist. Zu finden sind diese infoffiziellen Accounts im Friendica Directory:




Thanks to
@𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭, @Guido Arnold, @Markus, @resu, @Perig Gouanvic, @Hochschul-Piraten Dresden

Wenn Ihr noch weitere solcher Accounts kennt. könnt Ihr den Beitrag gerne kommentieren.

Viel Spaß im Fediverse

#newhere #neuhier #diaspora #friendica #mastodon #gnusocial #fediverse
Ho Chi Minh 
Merkwürdiger Artikel. Fordert Sozialismus für große Konzerne, statt diese einfach mal alleine zu lassen.

Damit NGOs, Mediengestalter und andere zum Fediverse kommen, müssen sie das Konstrukt einfach verstehen. Dazu muss es verständliche Vorträge, Tutorials, Artikel, Videos und so weiter geben. Zeigt den Menschen, wo es besser ist und wie sie es einfach basser machen können. Der Kampf gegen die Großen ist ein langer und zerfressender Kampf, bei dem keiner gewinnen wird und die Zeir weiterhin einfach vergeht.

Warum sollte jemand die egozentrischen Giganten zwingen etwas zu tun, wogegen sie seit Jahren arbeiten? Das macht aus deren Sicht keinen Sinn. Und ehrlich gesagt: Warum auf die warten, die sowieso kein Interesse haben?

Wir haben im Fediversum so viele Alternativen. Sofern man eine Statistik aufstellen kann (bei dezentralen unterschiedlichen Netzwerken ist das schwierig) dürften in den Netzwerken von #Friendica #Hubzilla #Diaspora #Mastodon #Pleroma #GNUSocial #Misskey #SocialHome #GangGo um 3 - 4 Mio Accounts existieren. Dazu kommen natürlich noch #Pixelfed #Peertube #Funkwhale usw.

Meines Erachtens ist is überhaupt nicht wichtig die Konzerne auf Standards zu zwingen. Wir haben doch längst alle Standards die wir brauchen. Wir sollten aufhören uns zu echauffieren gegen irgendwas. Wir sollten uns mehr engagieren FÜR irgendwas. Und dieses FÜR haben wir hier.

Definieren wir einfach mal technische Möglichkeiten, wie Organisationen Inhalte verbreiten können. Und fangen wir mit

  • RSS an.
  • Dann JSON,
  • dann ActivityPub für interaktives Netzwerken ,
  • dann XMPP (das die Basis für Facebook, Whatsapp, GoogleTalk, GMX usw war).



Alleine mit diesen 4 "einfachen" Technologien brauchen wir lange kein Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Instagram oder ähnliches mehr. Und das Meiste davon ist schon seit sehr langer Zeit da. Aber die guten Erklärbären fehlen noch, die das in Videotutorials, in Artikeln und bei Entscheidern erklären.
 


The federated social network #Friendica has just released its new version 2019.01, which now includes full #ActivityPub support:

https://github.com/friendica/friendica/releases/tag/2019.01

Thanks to ActivityPub, it federates with Mastodon, PixelFed, Pleroma, PeerTube, NextCloud Social, Osada, Hubzilla etc.

Friendica also still has federation with #Diaspora, so if you're wanting to follow ActivityPub accounts without leaving your Diaspora friends, Friendica might be a good option.
 

Sharing Photos In Private Posts


When you share public posts, photos are transferred to users of other systems along with the text of the post. Occasionally a photo gets lost along the way, but that's no issue with authentication, but with federation.

Things change, when you share a private post with photos.

On Diaspora you can have EXIFs automatically removed from your photos in the settings section. You always upload a photo into a specific post. The photo is assigned a link and the photo is public. Yet the link to a photo contains a long string of random characters, so the photo is hard to find.

Friendica and Hubzilla have photo albums. So users can upload photos into posts or into photo albums. That means the access to a post and the access to photos are controlled independently. Friendica and Hubzilla also do not automatically remove EXIFs from photos. Depending on your settings EXIFs can reveal the time the photo was taken, the camera model and the location. EXIFs can be removed before uploading a photo.

If a friendica or Hubzilla user uploads a photo into a private post, the access to the photo will be private too. Unfortunately that doesn't work across networks. If a friendica user makes a private post with a private photo, Hubzilla and Diaspora users will see the text of the post, but will only see a placeholder instead of the photo. It's the same for Hubzilla users sending to friendica and Diaspora.

So what can Hubzilla or friendica users do, if they want to share a private post with a photo across the network?

They can upload the photo first and make it public, then the photo can be seen by anyone looking at their photo albums in their account. That may be fine if the photo shows something mundane that only becomes personal in the context of the post. They can upload the photo to some other place (Nextcloud, own website, PixelFed,...) and embed it into their private post. That means the photo will not show up in the albums of the account.

Hubzilla users can make their private post with photos accessible with a guest access token. That means they create a link that allows access to their channel and shows the private post with photos to anyone who has the link. They can set that guest access token to expire after a certain time. I have used this option and I think it's one of the coolest features of Hubzilla. The photos remain private and even if the link ends up in the wrong place, the access to the post has a time limit as an additional safety feature. In addition the token links to the channel, which means one will see all public posts and the private post(s) that are allowed with the token. In other words a visitor will end up looking at news and flower photos, scrolling, and not knowing what to look for unless he got some info what the post is supposed to be about and how old it is. If the token has expired, the post in question will just have vanished. All the other posts will still be there.

You'll find more notes about this topic here:

https://hubzilla.a-zwenkau.de/channel/anna?f=&cat=Decentralized

#Diaspora #friendica #Hubzilla #photos #privacy
 
Sharing Across Platforms

If you are on Diaspora and you want to get some other user's public posts, you add the contact. If someone else wants to get your posts, she adds you as a contact. You will then be notified and can decide, if you add that contact as well or not. You can sort your contacts into aspects and share private post with some some aspects, but not others. It is not obvious, if the other user is on Diaspora, friendica or Hubzilla. The name of his server might be an indication, that's all. Once someone follows you, she remains on your contact list. There is no way for you to remove her. Over time your contact list therefore gets cluttered with contacts who have stopped using their accounts long ago.

If you want to get someone's public posts you add that user to your contacts. You get to see the profile of the user, if you like, the page with the public posts before you add the user, so you know which platform he uses. You will get to see a Diaspora user's public posts, after you add him. A Hubzilla user gets to decide which permissions you are granted, just like you can grant various, detailed permissions to other users from any platform. A Diaspora user can follow you back which gets the Hubzilla user a standard set of permissions - or not.

A friendica user can decide to accept a contact as mutual friendship, only allow you to see his posts without seeing yours or ignore your request altogether. If a contact request is ignored, the Hubzilla user will get the same symbol she gets when a Diaspora user doesn't follow back. A friendica user can also see which system his contacts use.

I think being able to add a user to my contacts while not allowing his posts in my stream is very useful. I use my Diaspora and Hubzilla accounts for different content. I have people following both accounts, because they want to see both types of content. But I don't need to see their posts twice. I can still share private posts with those contacts on both platforms.

Friendica and Hubzilla users can sort their contacts into groups which are similar to the aspects of Diaspora.

Friendica and Hubzilla users can remove contacts. The removed contacts will no longer receive any of their posts then. When I removed my Hubzilla and Diaspora account from the friendica account's contacts, the friendica account was still shown as working in their contact lists. I had to remove the friendica account from the other two accounts as well and then reconnect all three of them to show the connections correctly.

You'll find more notes about this topic here:

https://hubzilla.a-zwenkau.de/channel/anna?f=&cat=Decentralized

#Diaspora #friendica #Hubzilla #sharing
 

About The Decentralized Network


Yesterday I signed up to friendica. I already have this account on Hubzilla and another one on Diaspora. I've just begun to explore friendica and thought it might be a good idea to take notes. Then I realized it may make sense to share these notes, because you probably all have contacts with users from the two other platforms and it may be interesting for you to see what they can and cannot do. Some things look confusing from the perspective of a another platform.

The most common odd thing Diaspora users will have seen is friendica users seemingly talking to themselves in the comments, when they are really replying to mastodon comments that are not federated to Diaspora.

I'm aware that there are differences between servers as well. Friendica and Hubzilla have lots of features the admin can install or not. Diaspora can be customized. From what I have seen pluspora looks quite different from the other Diaspora pods.

I can only write about my experience with the servers I have signed up to, of course. I'm merely a user, I don't have the expertise to run a server and therefore none of the services I write about. Since Hubzilla posts can be edited, I may do that from time to time when I learn something new.

No matter where you are on the network or if you are on it at all, you will be able to find the latest version of all notes on this topic with this link:

https://hubzilla.a-zwenkau.de/channel/anna?f=&cat=Decentralized

#Diaspora #friendica #Hubzilla #network
 

Oha - Doch ganz schön unterschiedlich

Ich habe zu Testzwecken einen Account auf #Diaspora (Pluspora) eröffnet, weil ich wissen wollte wie das mit der #Formatierung bei Friendica dann drüben bei Diaspora aussieht.

Ja gut... Die Möglichkeiten der Formatierung sind bei D* dann doch ganz schön eingeschränkt im Vergleich zu #Friendica und manche Dinge werden dort einfach falsch formatiert oder gleich gar nicht erst angezeigt - bzw. dann nur als einfacher Link.

Das ist natürlich ein bisschen unschön. Auch hatte ich vor kurzem hier auf Friendica das Problem, dass mir scheinbar ein Link eines D* Posts nicht angezeigt wurde und der Beitrag für mich lediglich aus einem einzigen Hashtag bestand. Andererseits ist es natürlich toll, dass die Kommunikation zwischen den unterschiedlichen Plattformen überhaupt funktioniert!

Edit: Mir fällt gerade auf, dass das so nicht ganz korrekt ist. Es geht weniger um die Formatierung als um die Konvertierung von BB-Code. Einiges was man bei Friendica an BB-Code nutzen kann, wird nicht korrekt Konvertiert, so dass es bei D* dann die Formatierung durcheinander haut oder einfach nur einen Link statt eines eingebundenen Videos anzeigt etc.

Fazit:
Man sollte sich die Beiträge von anderen Netzwerken des #Fediverse vielleicht doch ab und an mal direkt auf deren Seite ansehen, sofern sie öffentlich sind. Das kann nämlich doch ganz schön anders aussehen, als man vielleicht dachte.
 
What if any options are there for running Federated social networking tools on or through #OpenWRT or related router systems on a single-user or household basis?

I'm trying to coordinate and gather information for #googleplus (and other) users looking to migrate to Fediverse platforms, and I'm aware that OpenWRT, #Turris (I have a #TurrisOmnia), and several other router platforms can run services, mostly #NextCloud that I'm aware.

Is #diaspora itself viable on these systems? I'm thinking that may be ambitious.

If not, what are considerations for running a small node through a router? Primary considerations would be capacity planning, bandwidth and load impacts, and configuration and security considerations.

Hoping there's some expertise here.

#openwrt #networking #selfhosting #servers #linux
 
Is there something I'm not understanding about aspects? Please help me out. Here's how I think about them.
If you have a bunch of aspects (like I do), you can easily organize your incoming stream by topic, but only if the people you are following fit the aspects. Essentially, they have to be single topic posters, or your aspects have to be really broad. And what's weird is that in theory, you're interested in both, but all the people you're following should only be interested in one or the other. If that doesn't hold, then reading only posts by people in one aspect, and then the posts by people in another aspect, results in you seeing all the posts by the people in both aspects, again. Thus, this only works for aspects that aren't based on topics: where you met people, or personal categories like interesting or boring, which is again weird.
If you want to use aspects to control your outgoing posts by topics, you have the problem of not knowing what other people are interested in. Now you need a public post announcing your outgoing aspects and tell your followers to "sign up". Now you know whom to add to which aspect. And if they are no longer interested in seeing these posts of yours in that aspect, they have to tell you that they no longer care about that aspect of yours, which might hurt your feelings, so they don't do it. Potentially easier: unfollow.
None of this makes aspects the kind of feature I want. Apparently, aspects are only useful if you have totally disjunct aspects: if you need to separate friends, family and work, for example. In my case, I still have some people from the office I consider to be friends, but luckily they're not active on social media and certainly not on Diaspora.
Sooooo... how do you use #aspects in #diaspora?
 
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The Social Media Conundrum

Social Media can be exploitative and addictive. However, the way we use it and the platforms we choose will determine our experience.


Five basic types of users:
1. Social: sharing personal updates and photos regarding daily life with interaction based on building and maintaining relationships
2. Consumers: following others for entertainment or information (interaction less important - this includes lurkers)
3. Content Creators: those who put effort into crafting posts or videos as a creative act (includes content curators)
4. Spammers: intrusive unwanted promotion
5. Trolls: entertainment by bullying, stalking, or recruiting others into smear campaigns




The first three user types are the focus of this article. Identification of what features work for us and against us will form future trends. We need to understand and decide what we want or it will be decided for us.

Facebook


FB is massive. It has changed our culture for the better and for the worse. We, as social media users, have also evolved through using it. This article is not about bashing FB but by looking closer at FB specifically we can understand our future social media needs.

Facebook has done a great job in providing a platform that caters to the social aspect of social media. They also limit spammers and trolls which is also very important. It is the biggest platform which means most of the people we care about are on it. If you have a small number of "friends," and don't mind all the ads, then FB may still work for you. FB is also useful for small business owners that want to maintain a relationship with the local community.

FB is Terrible for Content Creators


This includes authors, educators, doctors, social change leaders, artists, musicians, activists, or anyone else that has an important message to share. FB is no longer the place for gaining a big following. Those days are in the past and the algorithm works against growth unless you pay for it. The lack of good content makes the feed dumb. Only the most pallid posts survive which means there is a huge lack of thought, critical thinking, innovation, or creativity. This is a HUGE problem because FB has become a major influence on modern society. Politics is a great example. People post in thoughtless sound bite memes which has resulted in snowball fights instead of discussion. A stupid population is easy to take advantage of and we need our wits about us now more than ever. The search function is also terrible, but that makes sense because that function is only needed when searching for good content.

We Want to Control Our Feed


The problem with any platform that uses an algorithm is that the feed is controlled. There was a time, in our social media evolution, where we put up with an algorithm because otherwise our feed became full of clutter. But people are getting better at both knowing what they want and posting better quality posts. Let us choose what we want to see!



Control the People = Power


Cults succeed by supplying unmet needs and then exploiting it. FB operates the same way. When you control the people you control commerce, politics, and power. Wake up people, this is happening. FB is not your friend and it has an agenda.

FB is grossly exploitative. Your posts will not be seen by your friends unless it is sensational (evokes lower nature emotions based on the same parameters of addiction, gambling, and pornography). FB literally profits by making people depressed and sick-minded. That is their commodity. No joke.

#DeleteFacebook

“Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg have amassed a scary amount of power. Facebook unilaterally decides the news that billions of people around the world see every day. It buys up or bankrupts potential competitors to protect its monopoly, killing innovation and choice. It tracks us almost everywhere we go on the web and, through our smartphones, even where we go in the real world. It uses this intimate data hoard to figure out how to addict us and our children to its services. And then Facebook serves up everything about us to its true customers — virtually anyone willing to pay for the ability to convince us to buy, do, or believe something.” - from Freedom from Facebook
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The #DeleteFacebook movement is a big deal. The average user likes to believe they are simply putting up with ads and data mining regarding things they already want to buy but that's not the issue. The way in which FB sells data and to who they are willing to sell your personal information is terrifying.

Your Followers, Your Content, Think Again


Powerhouse content creators, that have built thousands and millions of followers, are having their pages deleted without warning and without anyone to call. This can happen anytime for any reason. It is an outrage.

Centralized = They Own Your Content


The same data mining, exploitation, and deletions are happening on all the big platforms. I, personally, amassed over 100,000 followers on Google+ only to have the entire platform shutdown. Centralized means the platform is controlled by one company or entity and stored only on their servers. Centralized social media platforms are a bad set up. FB, Google, and many of the other platforms, have shown us what we don't want. We don't want a controlled feed, ads, centralization, or data mining.

The Future


We must take back the internet and can start with where we spend time. The following is a basic list of criteria needed in social media sites.
1. Open Source - the code must be transparent without any hidden agendas and must allow for collaboration in change and improvement
2. Decentralized - the platform must be hosted from multiple servers (like the internet itself) so that it is owned by no one and safe from corruption
3. No Algorithm - the user must control their own feed
4. No Ads - no explanation needed
5. No Data Mining - this means your content is not sold or exploited and your content only benefits your subscribers, you, and the quality of the platform

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#diaspora
Note: Many are going to MeWe and Vero but they are centralized and can be bought, sold, or changed once you invested time and content. So far, Diaspora and Minds are my two favorite platforms but there are many good contenders out there.
 
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How does Pluspora actually compare to Google+

I still have friends on G+ who are going to stay until the bitter end and are convinced they will not find any sort of alternative so I will list some of their concerns about Pluspora.
  • Concern about data collected, how secure it is and who can read it.
  • Not able to edit a post
  • No communities
  • What happens if the pod just closes or breaks down ?
  • Where are photos stored and can people access them ?
  • Can you move a profile to another pod?
  • The app from the Play store does not work that well so how safe is it to download the dandelion app from F-Droid
  • Do the existing G+ refugees recommend this place
I have made this post public so hopefully my friends on the other side will be reassured by some of your answers

It is my view that this pod (pluspora) will eventually be the ideal replacement for G+ and even in it's present state has a much better spam control, display, communication and "circle" management system

#googleplus #googleplusrefugee #gplus #pluspora #diaspora #help
 
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How does Pluspora actually compare to Google+

I still have friends on G+ who are going to stay until the bitter end and are convinced they will not find any sort of alternative so I will list some of their concerns about Pluspora.
  • Concern about data collected, how secure it is and who can read it.
  • Not able to edit a post
  • No communities
  • What happens if the pod just closes or breaks down ?
  • Where are photos stored and can people access them ?
  • Can you move a profile to another pod?
  • The app from the Play store does not work that well so how safe is it to download the dandelion app from F-Droid
  • Do the existing G+ refugees recommend this place
I have made this post public so hopefully my friends on the other side will be reassured by some of your answers

It is my view that this pod (pluspora) will eventually be the ideal replacement for G+ and even in it's present state has a much better spam control, display, communication and "circle" management system

#googleplus #googleplusrefugee #gplus #pluspora #diaspora #help
 
I just blocked @prep@diasp.org on my servers, it's rassist and deletes answers that criticize the posts, maybe some of the other #Diaspora or #Friendica admins want to block this account too.


!Friendica Admins
 
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